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En utskrift från Dagens Nyheter, 2019-08-18 01:24

Artikelns ursprungsadress: https://www.dn.se/debatt/sweden-is-an-important-partner-for-uk-business/

DN Debatt

DN Debatt. ”Sweden is an important partner for UK business”

Today, Wednesday 29 March, I formally wrote to Donald Tusk to give effect to the democratic decision of the people of the United Kingdom who last year voted decisively to leave the European Union, writes Theresa May, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Bild: Christopher Furlong TT

It is in all our interests for the partnership between the UK and the EU to allow maximum freedom for British companies to trade with, and operate within, European markets, and the same for Swedish companies in the UK. It would be to the detriment of us all if unnecessary barriers to trade were erected, writes Theresa May, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

Today, Wednesday 29 March, I formally wrote to Donald Tusk to give effect to the democratic decision of the people of the United Kingdom who last year voted decisively to leave the European Union.

At this moment of profound significance for my country, I want to assure you that this decision was no rejection of the values we share as fellow Europeans. Nor was it an attempt to do harm to the European Union or any of the remaining Member States. On the contrary, the United Kingdom wants the European Union to succeed and prosper.

Our referendum was a vote to restore, as we see it, our national self-determination. We are leaving the European Union, but we are not leaving Europe – and we want to remain committed partners and allies of Sweden and all our friends across the continent.

Indeed, Britain and Sweden have worked closely together on so many of the issues that unite us – from promoting free trade and increasing Europe’s competitiveness to strengthening the stability and security of the Baltic region. We greatly value this continuing friendship between our two countries.

As Europe’s closest friend and neighbour, we hope to enjoy a deep and special partnership with the whole of the European Union once we leave. This deep and special partnership should take in both economic and security cooperation, for this is in the interests of the United Kingdom, Sweden, the European Union and the wider world.

Britain and Sweden have worked closely together on so many of the issues that unite us – from promoting free trade and increasing Europe’s competitiveness to strengthening the stability and security of the Baltic region. We greatly value this continuing friendship between our two countries.

We want to make sure that Europe remains strong and prosperous and is capable of projecting its values, leading in the world, and defending itself from security threats – and we want the United Kingdom, through this new deep and special partnership with a strong European Union, to play its full part in achieving these goals.

So we approach these talks constructively, respectfully, and in a spirit of sincere cooperation. We have listened carefully to what our European counterparts have said and we respect their position. That is why, for example, the United Kingdom does not seek membership of the Single Market. European Leaders have been clear that membership of the Single Market entails accepting the ‘four freedoms’. We understand that these are indivisible and there can be no “cherry picking”. For that reason, we do not seek membership of the Single Market but the greatest possible access to it through a new bold and ambitious Free Trade Agreement.

Similarly, we understand that there will be consequences for the UK of leaving the EU: we know that we will lose influence over the rules that affect the European economy. We also know that UK companies that trade with the EU will have to align with rules agreed by institutions of which we are no longer a part – just as UK companies do in other overseas markets. We accept that.

But there should be no reason why we cannot agree a new deep and special partnership between the UK and the EU that works for us all.

Sweden is an important partner for UK business and the UK is the fourth largest EU market for Swedish goods. There are also complex supply chains that benefit both our countries. So it is in all our interests for the partnership between the UK and the EU to allow maximum freedom for British companies to trade with, and operate within, European markets, and the same for Swedish companies in the UK. It would be to the detriment of us all if unnecessary barriers to trade were erected.

Similarly, we must continue to forge the closest possible security co-operation to keep our people safe. In an increasingly unstable world, that collaboration is more, not less, important for us all. We face the same global threats from terrorism and extremism and that message was only reinforced by the abhorrent terrorist attack in London last week.

I want the UK’s new relationship with the EU to ensure that – whether it comes to exchanging the information our security services need, or working together to protect Europe’s borders - we have the closest possible relationship.

This new partnership is of such importance to both the UK and the EU that we are sure it can be agreed within the timeframe for the negotiations and in a way that strengthens the liberal, democratic values of Europe that we all share – and that the world needs now more than ever.

That is why we will continue to play our part in ensuring that Europe remains strong and prosperous and able to lead in the world, projecting its values and defending itself from security threats. The new deep and special partnership we seek will allow us to do so, contributing to the prosperity, security and global power of our continent to the benefit of all.